January 20, 2022
Eight scholars appointed studying topics from implicit bias to religion and Hollywood
January 20, 2022
This is the year. I’ll read a book a week. I’ll write 500 words a day, seven days a week. I’ll publish two articles. I’ll organize my deadlines, exercise three times a week, learn Spanish, sort out my finances...
December 17, 2021
The idea of “unplugging” can smack of a certain irony at a time when much of our leisure (and much more of our work) happens within the context of our attachment to technology and our technology’s attachment to the...
December 3, 2021
I have over a dozen browser tabs open on Google Chrome right now. I could maybe close a few of these. But opening a bunch of tabs when you research a topic has its use: cross-checking the information you read and its sources. That...
December 3, 2021
Now that the calendar has flipped to December, we wanted to leave you with some quick tips for managing the whirlwind that is the end of the fall term. And remember, don't be afraid to reach out–to us at the FWC, to your...
November 22, 2021
Through The Advising Project, GSAS has shared best practices with faculty that include ways to help graduate students navigate their graduate careers and prepare for their chosen profession through the development of professional...
November 12, 2021
Trying to work through my academic goals during lockdown brought to the surface a tension that I had felt, but not really acted upon, in my earlier years as a graduate student: the tension between being productive and giving myself...
October 29, 2021
When we’re working on a piece of academic writing, we tend to seek inspiration from—and measure our efforts against—the published work we most admire. This kind of emulation is an important part of learning, but we...
October 15, 2021
A colleague whose work I deeply admire once shared with me an academic essay she had just finished writing. The piece was a fascinating offshoot of another project: I thought it was beautifully written and cleverly framed. She pulled...
October 1, 2021
“It is good to have hair-splitters & lumpers,” Charles Darwin wrote in an 1857 letter to his closest friend, the British botanist and explorer Joseph Dalton Hooker. Darwin was characterizing—and caricaturing...

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