The Center for Writing and Communicating Ideas (CWCI) seeks to provide GSAS students with the means to enhance the clarity and depth of their communications. In doing so, it supports a vision of the leading role of GSAS research in the world. 

Center Director and Tutor Bios

Suzanne Smith is the director of the Center for Writing and Communicating Ideas. Her current research pertains to religion, law, poetry, and the visual arts. She also teaches in history and literature, in the fields of European studies, the early modern world, the modern world, and America.

Christopher Brown received his PhD from the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures at Harvard University, specializing in medieval and Renaissance Italian Studies. His current research examines the convergence and legacy of temporal innovation in Trecento and Quattrocento Italy: from the intersection of mechanical clocks and tower bells, to the ingenious poetic expressions of Dante and Petrarch. In addition to teaching Italian literature and language, Chris has served as the coordinating fellow of Dudley House and as a visiting doctoral fellow at Villa I Tatti in Florence. Other research interests include Renaissance sport and spectacle, the multivalent origins of the "genius" figure, and the avant-garde poetic movements of the 20th century.

Han Hsien Liew received his PhD in History and Middle Eastern Studies from Harvard University, specializing in medieval Islamic political thought. His current research focuses on the political ideas of Ibn al-Jawzi, a Muslim religious scholar and preacher in twelfth-century Baghdad. He explores the ways in which Ibn al-Jawzi's ameliorative approach to politics departs from the radical and quietist strands of political thinking in Islam. Other interests include medieval Islamic scholarly culture, Islam in Southeast Asia, and premodern Western political thought. Han Hsien is excited to assist with various kinds of writing and communication projects.

Adam Stack received a PhD in anthropology from Harvard University. He specializes in the archaeology of colonialism in the Americas, and has done research in the US Southwest, Peru, and New England. His current work concerns Indigenous peoples’ relationship with the natural world and the cultural impact of environmental contamination. His other interests include cultural heritage, museums, and cartography.

 

The CWCI offers individual consultations (by appointment), peer review groups, dedicated writing space, workshops, and other programming to support registered GSAS students at all stages of their careers. Tutoring support is offered to all GSAS students in any discipline who seek to improve their academic papers, dissertations, and presentations. Overall, the CWCI helps GSAS students to heighten the impact of their research by fostering and refining their written and oral communication skills.

GSAS students are eligible to make one appointment per week, dependent upon availability. Appointments are filled on a first-come, first-served basis. In your e-mail, describe the piece of writing (or writing-related topic) that you would like to discuss and what your goals are for the meeting. Make an arrangement to send your piece of writing (ideally, double-spaced and at least 12pt font) as an attachment. Be sure to confirm your appointments after a date has been suggested. Students are welcome to submit pieces of writing that are at any stage of completeness. Very rough drafts are fine, as are more polished pieces or papers that students are preparing for publication. Appointments generally take one hour; shorter appointments are available as well.

What services are available?

We currently offer individual consultations, dedicated writing space, workshops, and other programming.

Individual consultations are frequently geared toward improving the overall argument, structure, and style of your papers or chapters. You can also make an appointment to prepare for oral presentations, or to work on specific writing and speaking skills. Letting your tutor know in advance what you would like to work on is key.

Workshops and other programming (talks, events, etc.) will be announced on the website and elsewhere throughout the academic year.

Writing Groups will be formed in the fall and spring semesters. If you are interested in being part of a group, please e-mail Suzanne Smith.