2014–2015

SECONDARY FIELDS

AFRICAN AND AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES

Students enrolled in a PhD program in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University may achieve formal recognition for completing a secondary field in African and African American studies. Graduate students who choose African and African American studies as a secondary field will benefit from learning how to do interdisciplinary work on the basis of the substantial body of scholarly writing on African and African American social, cultural, economic and political life and history. The department also encourages comparative work on African, African American, and diasporic topics.

Graduate students must meet the following requirements in order to have the secondary field officially recorded on their transcript.

Coursework

Completion of four graduate-level courses in African and African American Studies with honors grades of B+ or above.

Demonstrating Mastery in the Secondary Field

Successful completion of a research paper demonstrating mastery in the field of African and African American studies is also required. Ordinarily this is the most successful graduate term paper written for one of the four African and African American studies courses.

Record-keeping

Students interested in declaring a secondary field in African and African American studies should submit to the director of graduate studies evidence of their successful participation in four appropriate graduate courses in the Department of African and African American Studies as well as the research paper. Once they obtain the approval of the DGS they and the registrar will receive certification of successful completion of secondary field requirements.

AMERICAN STUDIES

A student enrolled in a PhD program in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Harvard may achieve formal recognition for completing a secondary field in American Studies. The interdisciplinary breadth of American Studies and its wide-ranging subject matter make it an attractive secondary field for students from many departments, including English, history, economics, history of art and architecture, music, film and visual studies, religion, anthropology, sociology, and psychology.

The American Studies program spans all aspects of American culture, often with a comparative focus, from European colonization to the present, and it includes a wide range of sources, methods, and theories. Over the last ten years, PhD students from other disciplines have enrolled in the American Studies Colloquium and/or the Warren Center seminar, and they have incorporated sources and approaches from American Studies into their dissertations.

Coursework

  1. Completion of a minimum of four half-course (semester-long) courses. All four courses must be
    1. Taken with a member of the Committee on Higher Degrees in American Studies,
    2. Chosen from catalog sections headed “Primarily for Graduates,” and
    3. Taken outside the student’s home department.
  2. One of these courses must be Am. Civ. 200 or 201 (Am. Civ. Colloquia).
  3. Another of these courses must be a seminar requiring a major research paper.
  4. The remaining two may include the Am. Civ. Colloquium (200 or 201) not taken under ‘2,’ above, but this second Am. Civ. Colloquium is not required.
  5. Neither pass/fail nor audited courses will count towards a secondary PhD field in this department.

Advising and Record-keeping

Students interested in declaring a secondary field in American Studies should meet with both the chair and administrator of the program (617-495-3325; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ; Barker Center 225). Upon successful completion of the course requirements detailed above, the student should submit evidence thereof to the American Studies administrator. Upon approval by the American Studies chair, the student and the registrar will be notified that the secondary field requirements have been completed.

CELTIC MEDIEVAL LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

The Department of Celtic Languages and Literatures offers a secondary field in Celtic medieval languages and literatures for PhD students enrolled in other departments at Harvard. The Celtic languages, once spoken over much of Europe and Asia Minor, are of great linguistic interest, and the splendid medieval literatures of Ireland and Wales constitute a hugely rewarding field of study. Students of comparative literature, of other medieval languages and literatures, of history, of historical linguistics, and of religion may wish to consider this secondary field. Students, for example of medieval epic and romance, and of genres such as prophecy and vision poetry may wish for comparative purposes to read texts in the Celtic languages. The Celtic material offers invaluable sources for medieval historians of the Western Church, and of secular institutions and customs as well. Students of historical linguistics will know that a thorough knowledge of Old Irish is important for the investigation of Indo-European. The secondary field affords an opportunity to achieve professional competence in one of the Celtic languages, the range of its literature, and the scholarship in the field.

Requirements

The secondary field is organized in two separate tracks, Early and Medieval Irish, and Medieval Welsh. Each of them requires the student to take four half-courses in the department, the distribution of which is as follows:

Early and Medieval Irish: 
•    Irish 200: Introduction to Old Irish and Irish 201: Continuing Old Irish 
•    Either Irish 204r: Readings in Early Irish Poetry or Irish 205r: Readings in Early Irish Prose 
•    A Celtic course with a medieval focus, to be chosen in consultation with the director of graduate studies. Irish 204r or Irish 205r, whichever has not been chosen under b), is among the courses from which a choice will be made. 

Medieval Welsh: 
•    Welsh 225a: Medieval Welsh Language and Literature and Welsh 225b: Medieval Welsh Poetry
•    Either Welsh 226r: Readings in Middle Welsh Prose or Welsh 227: Seminar: Welsh Bardic Poetry 
•    A Celtic course with a medieval focus, to be chosen in consultation with the director of graduate studies. Welsh 226f or Welsh 227, whichever has not been chosen under b), is among the courses from which a choice will be made. 

Course schedule: Certain courses in the department are given in alternate years. Irish 204r, Irish 205r, Welsh 225a and Welsh 225b will be given in 2014-15. Irish 200, Irish 201r, Welsh 226r, Welsh 227 are expected to be given in 2015-16.

For details contact the Department Administrator, Mary Violette, or the Director of Graduate Studies, Tomás Ó Cathasaigh for fall term; Catherine McKenna for spring term.

CLASSICS

A student enrolled in a PhD program in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University, other than the programs offered in the Department of the Classics, may achieve formal recognition for completing a secondary field in one of the following programs offered in the department: classical archaeology; classical philology; Greek and Roman history.

Classical Archaeology

The following requirements must be met to complete a secondary field in classical archaeology.

Coursework

  • Completion of four half-courses. Qualifying courses include those taught within the departments of Classics and History of Art and Architecture, and accepted by the Department of the Classics towards the requirements of Classical Archaeology.
  • Two of the four half-courses shall be graduate seminars.
  • At least one of the four half-courses shall be on a Greek topic and another on a Roman topic.
  • Students are encouraged to take Classics 350: Classical Philology Proseminar or an appropriate proseminar offered by the Department of History of Art and Architecture.
  • Students may petition the director of graduate studies to be permitted to apply one course in anthropology, Near Eastern languages and civilizations, or the Divinity School towards the requirements of the secondary field.
  • The archaeological summer programs offered by the American School of Classical Studies at Athens and the American Academy in Rome, and the Graduate Summer Seminar of the American Numismatic Society will normally be accepted in lieu of one half-course.
  • Students pursuing a secondary field in classical archaeology are also strongly encouraged to participate in an archaeological field school or to serve as a curatorial intern in a museum of art or archaeology.

Classical Philology

The following requirements must be met to complete a secondary field in classical philology.

Coursework

Completion of four half-courses from among the following categories:

  • All graduate seminars taught within Classics
  • Other courses that are required for the PhD in classical philology, i.e.: Classics 350: Classical Philology Proseminar, Greek K: Advanced Greek Prose Composition, Latin K: Advanced Latin Prose Composition, Greek 134: The Language of Homer, Latin 134: Archaic Latin
  • All other 100-level courses with the prefix “Greek” or “Latin”
  • Two of the half-courses shall be graduate seminars.
  • Courses taught primarily in translation are ineligible.

Greek and Roman History

The following requirements must be met to complete a secondary field in Greek and Roman history.

Coursework

Completion of four half-courses from the following categories:

  • All graduate seminars taught within Classics
  • Other courses that are certified by Classics as counting towards the requirement in Ancient History in the several PhD programs offered by the department
  • Two of the four half-courses shall be graduate seminars.
  • At least one of the four half-courses shall be on a Greek topic and another on a Roman topic.
  • Normally at least one course will involve close reading of historical texts in the original language, but this requirement may be waived at the discretion of the director of graduate studies.

Advising

Please send questions about the degrees or secondary fields in the Classics to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

The Department of Comparative Literature offers Comparative Literature as a secondary field in GSAS to enrich the education of Ph.D. students in other departments who seek to do research and teach across the institutional boundaries of national languages and literatures. As faculty members, students specializing in a national literature may be called on to teach comparative courses or courses in general or world literature. The secondary field in Comparative Literature prepares them to do so by introducing them to basic issues in the field.

Although the department recognizes that literatures in a single language constitute a coherent tradition, Comparative Literature seeks to develop an awareness of how literary works move across language borders, both in the original language and in translation.  The department calls attention to theoretical issues shared not only across the boundaries of languages but also across very different traditions..

Prerequisites

An ability to work in literatures in at least three languages. Normally this will be demonstrated by coursework in which at least some of the primary readings are in the language. In certain circumstances (for example, if one of the languages is the student’s native language) the DGS may waive the requirement that competence in a language be demonstrated by coursework. If English is used as one of the languages, the other two languages should show some breadth; that is, they may not be closely allied, either linguistically or by academic convention (e.g., Spanish and Portuguese, Urdu and Hindi, classical and modern Chinese, or Greek and Latin). The judgment regarding what can legitimately count for the set of three languages will be at the discretion of the DGS.

Requirements

1) Four courses, one of which must be the Comparative Literature proseminar and two of which must be other Comparative Literature seminars at the 200 level. The remaining course requirements will be met by either 200-level seminars in Comparative Literature or 100-level Literature courses, which normally count for graduate credit in Comparative Literature.

2) Successful completion of a Second-Year Paper of 25-30 pages on a comparative topic, as required for students in Comparative Literature.  Students doing a secondary field in Comparative Literature do not need to submit the Second-Year Paper by the first week of the G3 year, but they are encouraged to submit this paper as soon thereafter as possible.

Contact the Director of Graduate Studies, Professor Karen Thornber with any further questions.

Further information regarding courses and programs of study in comparative literature may be found on our website.

COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Graduate students across Harvard can complete a secondary field in computational science and engineering (CSE). This secondary field is available to any student enrolled in a PhD program in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences upon approval of a plan of study by the CSE Program Committee and the director of graduate studies in the student’s home department.

Contacts for questions about the CSE secondary field: All questions should be directed to Daniel Weinstock, Assistant Director of Graduate Studies in Computational Science and Engineering (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

CSE is an exciting and rapidly evolving field that exploits the power of computation as an approach to major challenges on the frontiers of natural and social science and all engineering fields. In keeping with Harvard’s emphasis on foundational knowledge, this program will focus on cross-cutting mathematical and computational principles important across disciplines.

Completion of the secondary field will equip students with rigorous computational methods for approaching scientific questions. These approaches include mathematical techniques for modeling and simulation of complex systems; parallel programming and collaborative software development; and methods for organizing, exploring, visualizing, processing and analyzing very large data sets.

Admission

Admission into the CSE secondary field is by application, which must be submitted to the SEAS Student Affairs office. Students interested in the secondary field should consult with their departmental director of graduate studies (DGS) no later than the first semester of the third year of study. Applications may be submitted twice a year, in the spring semester (deadline: March 1) and fall semester (deadline: October 1) for the following academic term. The application, which will include a proposed Plan of Study, must also be approved by the home department DGS. The DGS in CSE will respond to all applications within one month.

Requirements

Each student’s plan of study for the secondary field will include:

  • At least one applied mathematics core course and one computer science core course
  • One or two electives in AM or CS (chosen from lists below)
  • As a substitute for one elective, either a “domain elective”—an approved computation-intensive course within the PhD domain—or a semester-length independent research project
  • As a final requirement, an oral examination by a faculty committee

Course requirements at a glance:

 

Secondary Field
Requirements
minmax
1. Core 2* 4
2. Applied Math electives 0 2
3. Computer Science electives 0 2
4. Domain elective 0 max of 1
299R research course 0 1 total 1
Total 4  

*must take at least one AM and one CS core course

1. Core: 2–4 courses

The goal of the core courses is to provide:

  • The mathematical foundations for computational science
  • Hands-on instruction in relevant ideas in computer science
  • Experience implementing these principles in collaborative projects in a rigorous software engineering environment

 

CSE core courses
AM 205 Advanced Scientific Computing: Numerical Methods Fall
AM 207 Advanced Scientific Computing: Stochastic Optimization Methods Spring
CS 205 Computing Foundations of Computational Science Fall
CS 207 Systems Design for Computational Science Spring

2. Applied Math electives: 0-2 courses

 

Suggested CSE Applied Math electives
AM 201 Physical Mathematics I Fall
AM 202 Physical Mathematics II Spring
AM 274 Computational Fluid Dynamics Spring
AM 275 Computational Design of Materials Spring
STATS 210 Probability Theory and Statistical Inference I Fall
STATS 285 Statistical Machine Learning Spring

3. Computer Science electives: 0-2 courses

 

Suggested CSE Computer Science electives
CS 222 Algorithms at the Ends of the Wire Fall
CS 226R Efficient Algorithms Fall
CS 246R Advanced Computer Architecture Fall
CS 281* Applied Machine Learning Spring

*proposed

4. Domain elective or 299R research course

A domain elective is a computation-intensive course outside CS and AM. A student wishing to earn Secondary Field credit for a proposed domain elective or 299R course must propose these courses in the Plan of Study and receive approval of the CSE Program Committee.

Advising and Academic Monitoring

A faculty member on the CSE Program Committee will serve in the role of Director of Graduate Studies for the Secondary Field. Daniel Weinstock, the Assistant Director of Graduate Studies (ADGS) who will be responsible for frontline advising of students, helping to create a meaningful program sensitive to the student’s needs. The ADGS will actively work to develop independent research projects and external research opportunities for all IACS students to maximize learning and skill acquisition and will help with the design of individual projects. All students will participate in the activities of the IACS community, which will include technical and interdisciplinary colloquia and skill-building workshops.

CRITICAL MEDIA PRACTICE

A secondary field in critical media practice (CMP) is offered for students who wish to integrate media production into their course of study. The CMP secondary field reflects changing patterns of knowledge production; in particular, it recognizes that knowledge is increasingly incorporated into novel multi-media configurations in which written language plays only a part. Audiovisual media have a different relationship to, and reveal different dimensions of, the world than exclusively verbal sign systems.  Students interested in making original interpretive projects in image, sound, and/or emerging hypermedia technologies in conjunction with their written scholarship may wish to pursue the CMP secondary field. It offers training in production and post-production in different media formats and genres, including documentary and ethnographic film and video; hypermedia, internet, and database projects; approaches to working with audio, including phonography, exhibition, and music composition; video and multimedia installation; and cognate genres. The goal throughout is to foster a complementarity between the writing of texts and the making of media productions.

Admission

Admission into the critical media practice secondary field is by application, which must be submitted to the This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. of the Film Study Center. Applications may be submitted twice a year, in the fall term (deadline, October 1) and in the spring (deadline, March 1). An admissions committee will meet, and the directors of graduate studies in CMP will communicate with all applicants before the end of the semester in which they apply.

Requirements

Students must take four of the following courses, of which at least two (but up to four) must be drawn from the Core. They must complete all four courses with grades of B+ or above. Additionally, CMP students produce a “capstone” media project in conjunction with their doctoral dissertation.

Core:
Students must take at least 2 of the following courses:

  • ANTH 2835r. Sensory Ethnography 1: Image/Sound/Culture
  • ANTH 2836r. Sensory Ethnography 2: Living Documentary
  • EALC 200. The Uses and Meaning of the New Arts of Presentation
  • GSD 3418/ANTH 2837/VES 162. Media Archaeology of Place
  • HISTSCI 252. Filming Science
  • HISTSCI 290. Critical Images, Object, Media
  • VES 350r. Critical Media Practice
  • Any VES Film/Video Production class

Electives:
Up to two of the required four courses may be drawn from the following list, so long as, and explicitly with the instructor’s approval, the student submits an original work of media in partial satisfaction of the course requirements. Elective course offerings vary from year to year, and will be updated on the CMP website. Current electives include:

  • AAAS 182. R&B, Soul and Funk
  • ANTH 2635. Image/Media/Publics
  • ANTH 2722. Sonic Ethnography
  • ANTH 2830. Creative Ethnography
  • ANTH 2688. The Frankfurt School, Film, and Popular Culture
  • EALC 205. Approaches to the Comparative History of Medicine and the Body
  • ES 20. How to Create Things and Have Them Matter
  • GSD 4351. Architecture and Film
  • GSD 3496. The Moment of the Monument
  • GSD 4424. Fifteen Things
  • GSD 4426. The Spectacle Factory
  • GSD 4353. Imagining the City: Literature, Film, and the Arts
  • HARC 276k. Frameworks in the Humanities: The Art of Looking
  • HISTSCI 126. The Matter of Fact: Physics in the Modern Age
  • HISTSCI 221. Einstein Reversed
  • MUSIC. Electroacoustic Composition
  • MUSIC 201b. Current Methods in Ethnomusicology
  • MUSIC 209. Seminars in Ethnomusicology
  • MUSIC 167. Introduction to Electroacoustic Music
  • VES 285x. Visual Fabrics

 

Capstone:

Building on their training in their coursework, students produce a media project that complements their doctoral dissertation. As with the PhD in media anthropology offered by the Department of Anthropology, it may consist of a video, a film, a sound work, a series of photographs, a work of hypermedia, or an exhibition or performance in which digital media play a key role. A faculty committee of two approved by the CMP DGS will evaluate the project at a CMP Capstone Defense. One member will be drawn from the CMP Faculty Advisory Committee, and one from the student’s dissertation committee. One copy (or, in the case of capstone projects involving site-specific exhibition or performance, documentation) of this project must be formally submitted in conjunction with the dissertation, and another copy archived with the Film Study Center.

Record-Keeping

GSAS students admitted to the CMP secondary field must provide a transcript of their coursework at the end of each semester in which they fulfill any of the curricular requirements of the CMP degree to the office manager, Film Study Center. In addition, once a student has satisfied all requirements of the degree, s/he must submit to the This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , Film Study Center, evidence of her/his successful participation in four appropriate graduate courses as well as a copy of their capstone project. Once they obtain the approval of the DGS, they and the registrar will receive certification of successful completion of CMP secondary field requirements.

Technical Support and Resources

Technical support for the CMP capstone project is provided by the Film Study Center, the Sensory Ethnography Lab, and FAS Media and Technology Services, all of which maintain an inventory of audio, video, and hypermedia production and post-production equipment. Students requesting technical support from the FSC must do so separately from their CMP admission application; a form for this purpose is available from the FSC’s program coordinator. Additionally, two locations on campus offer computer workstations with basic video and audio software, which are open to all Harvard students, and which CMP students may also use when editing their capstone projects. The Harvard-MIT Data Center, with two rooms in CGIS South, includes three Mac Pro workstations with Final Cut Studio and Logic Pro software installed. In Lamont Library, the MTS Multimedia Lab has both PC and Mac-based video editing stations equipped with hardware such as DV and VHS decks, and audio stations which, in addition to post-production editing, also allow digitization of analog sources such as cassette and LP.

Contact Information

Film Study Center (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ; web; phone: 617-495-9704)
Harvard University
24 Quincy St.
Cambridge MA 02138

FILM AND VISUAL STUDIES

A student enrolled in a PhD program in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University may achieve formal recognition for completing a secondary field in film and visual studies. The following requirements must be met to complete this secondary field.

Coursework

  • Completion of four graduate-level courses in film and visual studies with honors grades of B+ or above.
  • Two of these courses are required and should be taken in the first year of study:

VES 270. Proseminar in Film and Visual Studies: History

VES 271. Proseminar in Film and Visual Studies: Theory

  • Two other courses must be selected from among graduate courses taught by faculty of the Committee on Film and Visual Studies. The director of graduate studies will make a list of approved graduate seminars available at the beginning of each academic year.

Examinations

Successful completion of an examination or alternative means of demonstrating mastery in the field of film and visual studies is also required. The particular form of examination or alternative means of demonstrating mastery will be agreed upon by the DGS in film and visual studies and the DGS in the student’s home PhD department. This demonstration of mastery might be part of a departmental general or field examination, or it might be combined with departmental requirements in some other way. One or more members of the Committee on Film and Visual Studies will conduct and adjudicate the portion of the preliminary examination devoted to film and visual studies, and the results will be reported to both DGSs.

Advising

Students interested in declaring a secondary field in film and visual studies should consult with the DGS as early as possible, ordinarily no later than the end of the first term of graduate coursework. At this time, a plan of study should be prepared and submitted to the DGS, to be approved by the Committee on Film and Visual Studies as well as the student’s home department.

For further information contact Eric Rentschler, Director of Graduate Studies, Barker Center 350, Cambridge, MA 02138.

GERMAN

Requirements

In order to complete a secondary PhD field in German, graduate students take a minimum of four courses, at least two of which are on the 200 level (“Primarily for Graduates”) and the other two of which may be either on the 200 or the 100 level (“For Undergraduates and Graduates”). Students plan a coherent program of courses, complementing their primary course of study, in consultation with the director of graduate studies, who advises secondary field students. 100-level courses must be upgraded for graduate credit, which usually entails writing a longer paper or undertaking some other appropriate additional work to be arranged with the course instructor. With the approval of the director of graduate studies, one of the four courses may be taken in a related discipline if it is a course that would normally provide degree credit for a PhD candidate in Germanic Languages and Literatures. At least one of the four courses must yield a 20–25 page research paper to be approved by the course instructor and the director of graduate studies. Neither SAT/UNSAT nor audited courses count toward the secondary PhD field. Readings for courses in the department are customarily in German; thus German reading knowledge is a prerequisite. The department offers an average of 10 courses per academic year on the 100 and 200 levels, all of which are open to secondary PhD field students.

HISTORICAL LINGUISTICS

The Department of Linguistics offers a secondary field in historical linguistics for PhD students enrolled in other departments at Harvard. Historical linguistics, the study of how languages change over time, subsumes both the general study of language change and the history of specific languages and language families. The intellectual spectrum thus defined bridges part of the gap between linguistic theory and the areas traditionally known as “philology.” At Harvard, the more theoretical aspects of historical linguistics are covered in courses offered by the Department of Linguistics, while courses dealing with the historical linguistics of specific languages are offered both by the Department of Linguistics and the relevant language departments. In practice, many graduate students in the classics, Germanic languages and literatures, Slavic languages and literatures, Near Eastern languages and civilizations, and other language-centered departments take courses in historical linguistics as part of their ordinary preparation for the PhD. The availability of a secondary field in historical linguistics allows such students to have their work in linguistics officially recognized.

Coursework

Requirement: four half-courses, to be distributed as follows:

a) One of Linguistics 120 (Introduction to Historical Linguistics) or Linguistics 224 (Historical and Comparative Linguistics)

b) Three other courses in linguistics or cross-listed with linguistics, two of which must be chosen from the following:
Linguistics 122 (Introduction to Indo-European)
Linguistics 123 (Indo-European Phonology and Morphology)
Linguistics 158r (From Indo-European to Old Irish)
Linguistics 168 (Introduction to Germanic Linguistics)
Linguistics 176 (History and Prehistory of the Japanese Language)
Linguistics 220ar (Advanced Indo-European)
Linguistics 221r (Indo-European Workshop)
Linguistics 247 (Topics in Germanic Linguistics)
Linguistics 225a (Introduction to Hittite)
Linguistics 250 (Old Church Slavonic)
Linguistics 252 (Comparative Slavic Linguistics)
Greek 134 (The Language of Homer)
Latin 134 (Archaic Latin)
Semitic Philology 140 (Introduction to the Comparative Study of Semitic
Languages)
Semitic Philology 200r (Comparative Semitic Grammar: Seminar)
Slavic 125 (Modern Russian in Historical Perspective)

Other courses with a historical linguistic focus may be added to this list at the discretion of the director of graduate studies in linguistics.

Historical linguistics is one of the department’s traditional areas of strength. For courses offered in the 2014–2015 academic year, contact the department.

Advising

The contact person is the director of graduate studies in linguistics.

LINGUISTIC THEORY

The Department of Linguistics offers a secondary field in linguistic theory for PhD students enrolled in other departments at Harvard. Linguistic theory, the core of the modern field of linguistics, seeks to characterize the linguistic knowledge that normal human beings acquire in the course of mastering their native language between the ages of one and five. Studied as an internalized formal system, language is a source of insight into a wide range of human pursuits and abilities, some of them traditionally approached through the humanities, others through the social sciences, and others through the behavioral and natural sciences. The major divisions of linguistic theory are syntax, the study of sentence structure; phonology, the study of sounds and sound systems; morphology, the study of word structure; and semantics; the study of meaning. Courses in these areas regularly draw students from other Harvard departments, especially psychology, philosophy, and other departments associated with the Mind, Brain, Behavior Initiative. The secondary field in linguistic theory allows such students to receive official recognition for their linguistics coursework.

Coursework

Requirement: four half-courses, to be distributed as follows:

a) At least one of the following: Linguistics 112a (Introduction to Syntactic Theory)
Linguistics 114 (Introduction to Morphology)
Linguistics 115a (Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology)
Linguistics 116a (Introduction to Semantics)

b) Three other courses in linguistics, two of which must be chosen from the following: Linguistics 112b (Intermediate Syntax)
Linguistics 115b (Intermediate Phonology)
Linguistics 116b (Intermediate Semantics)
Linguistics 117r (Linguistic Field Methods)
Linguistics 132 (Psychosemantics)
Linguistics 145 (Logical Form)
Linguistics 146 (Syntax and Processing)
Linguistics 148 (Language Universals)
Linguistics 152 (Prosody and Intonation)
Linguistics 171 (Structure of Chinese)
Linguistics 174 (Tense and Aspect in Japanese)
Linguistics 175 (Structure of Japanese)
Linguistics 188r (Biolinguistics)
Linguistics 202r (Advanced Syntax)
Linguistics 204r (Topics in Syntax)
Linguistics 205r (The Syntax-Semantics Interface)
Linguistics 206r (Syntactic Structure and Argument Structure)
Linguistics 207r (Topics in Semantics)
Linguistics 219r (Advanced Phonology)

Other courses with a theoretical focus, including courses in other departments cross-listed with linguistics, may be added to this list at the discretion of the director of graduate studies in linguistics.

Although linguistics has no official “tracks” toward the PhD, linguistic theory is the department’s main intellectual focus. For courses offered in the 2013–2014 academic year, contact the department.

Advising

The contact person is the director of graduate studies in linguistics.

MEDIEVAL STUDIES

A student enrolled in a PhD program in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University may achieve formal recognition for completing a secondary field in Medieval Studies. The following requirements must be met to complete this secondary field.

Coursework and Examinations

  • Completion of four graduate-level courses in a medieval subject with grades of B+ or above.
  • One of these courses must be in paleography, and can be selected from the following: Medieval Studies 201, Medieval Studies 202, or Classics 277. Any other paleography course must be approved by the Medieval Studies Committee.
  • Each of the three additional courses must be in a different department, one of which may be the student’s home department, and chosen from among the 200-level courses listed each year on the Medieval Studies page of the Registrar’s course website.
  • Fulfillment of one language requirement in medieval Latin, Greek, Hebrew, or Arabic.
  • The language requirement must be fulfilled by passing an examination, administered by the Medieval Studies Committee. An exam in Latin is generally offered once in the fall and once in the spring. Examinations in other languages can be arranged upon request.

Advising

Incoming students interested in declaring a secondary field in Medieval Studies are encouraged to consult with the administrator or chair of the Medieval Studies Committee as early as possible in their studies. Students already in the program who are well on their way to completing requirements for the field or who wish to arrange a language examination also are encouraged to visit the Medieval Studies Program in Barker 121, or email the Program Administrator, Sean Gilsdorf (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ) to schedule a meeting.

MIND, BRAIN, and BEHAVIOR (MBB)

The secondary field of PhD study in Mind, Brain, and Behavior (MBB) may follow one of two tracks — a general track, or a specialized track.

The general track will draw PhD students in fields beyond MBB core disciplines. Participants will gain familiarity with basic issues related to mind, brain, and behavior but will not be required to do experimental research. A student in comparative literature, for example, who is interested in 18th-century notions of the self, might want some familiarity with contemporary cognitive neuroscience to complement her research.

The specialized track, by contrast, will draw PhD students whose home disciplines are within the MBB core. This track is intended to encourage education and research in fields outside the home discipline. A student in linguistics, for example, might do work with developmental psychologists on language acquisition. A natural way for such a student to satisfy the requirements of the specialized track might be to take a general course in developmental psychology, a directed reading course on language acquisition, and do two semesters of research in a developmental psychology lab working on projects involving language acquisition.

Program Requirements

MBB: General Track

Four half courses from MBB-related departments. One should be a foundational course, typically satisfied by a graduate level section of SLS 20. The three other courses should be chosen from MBB-related departments, and at least two of them should be at the graduate level, or at the undergraduate level but with special accommodations for graduate students. All four courses must be completed with a grade of B+ or higher. Proposals must be approved both by the student’s home field advisor and by a sub-committee of the Standing Committee in MBB.

MBB: Specialized Track

Four graduate-level half-courses from MBB-related departments. All four courses should be outside the student’s main area of research, and up to two of them may involve work in a lab. The four courses should be organized around a central theme, which the student will develop in consultation with at least one supervisor outside the main discipline. One of the courses can be a directed reading course. Proposals must be approved by the outside supervisor, the home field advisor, and a sub-committee of the Standing Committee on MBB.

Administrative Issues

Admission to and Review of Students in the Graduate Secondary Program

A small faculty sub-committee, appointed by the chairs of the MBB Standing Committee, will review proposals on an ad hoc basis throughout the year as they are received. In addition, each year this sub-committee will review the progress of those students enrolled in the program.

Advising

If you are considering the MBB secondary field, we would like you to consult with us before you begin taking courses for the program. To begin planning for either track, please contact MBB Education Program Coordinator This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . Once you have begun your secondary field work, your advising will depend upon the track you are following. For the general track, advising will come from the student’s home field advisor, the sub-committee, and the MBB Education Program Coordinator. For the specialized track, advising will come from the research director in the affiliated field and the student’s home field advisor; in addition, the sub-committee will give advice about structuring your specialized program at its outset.

MUSIC

A student enrolled in a PhD program in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University may achieve formal recognition for completing a secondary field in musicology and ethnomusicology. The following requirements must be met to complete this secondary field.

Coursework

  • Completion of a minimum of four half-course courses.
  • One of these courses must be an introductory course: Music 201a: Introduction to Historical Musicology, Music 201b: Introduction to Ethnomusicology, or Music 221: Current Issues in Theory.
  • The remaining three courses may be chosen from other graduate courses (200 level: “Primarily for Graduates”) or intermediate courses (150 level: “For Undergraduates and Graduates”). (No more than two courses may be chosen from the 150 level.), and receive honors grades of B+ or above.
  • Neither Pass/Fail nor audited courses will count towards a secondary PhD field in this department.

Record-keeping

Students interested in declaring a secondary field in music should submit to the director of graduate studies evidence of their successful participation in four appropriate courses in the music department. Once they obtain the approval of the DGS they and the registrar will receive certification of successful completion of secondary field requirements.

Advising

For further information contact the Director of Graduate Studies, Harvard University Department of Music, Music Building, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, 617-495-2791, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES (French, Italian, Portuguese, or Spanish)

In order to complete a secondary PhD field in Romance Languages and Literatures, a graduate student will take a minimum of four courses, at least three of which will be graduate courses (200 level: “Primarily for Graduates”) and no more than two of which can be intermediate courses (100 level: “For Undergraduates and Graduates”). Neither P/F nor audited courses will count towards a secondary PhD field in this department. All courses expected to count towards the secondary PhD field will be taken in the department, in the section of the student’s choice; in compelling cases, one “related course” may be counted towards the secondary field, with permission of the DGS. On average, the larger sections (French and Spanish) offer every academic year about nine 100-level courses and five 200-level courses each. Of the smaller sections, Italian offers up to six 100-level courses and two 200-level courses; Portuguese, two 100-level courses and two 200-level courses. Any and all of the courses offered by a given section at the 100 and 200 levels are open to secondary PhD field students in that section.

Graduate students interested in a Romance Languages and Literatures secondary PhD field should address their questions and requests to the director of graduate studies.

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND SOCIETY

GSAS offers a secondary field in science, technology, and society (STS) to candidates for the PhD, DDes, and SJD degrees.

Aims

The STS secondary field serves a wide range of student interests and career plans. For example: A sociologist or political scientist wants to investigate the impact of emerging technologies on the distribution of power in society. An engineer or public policy analyst would like to explore why innovation occurs unevenly across nations and time periods and how to encourage innovation in high-risk domains. A law student wants to know how nonwestern societies deal with intellectual property or bioethics. An anthropologist or a geneticist wishes to investigate how DNA databases affect individual rights and group identities. A historian would like to trace the evolution of nuclear secrecy policies from the postwar to the present. Through a structured program of interdisciplinary study, STS aims to satisfy these and many comparable lines of inquiry.

Foundations

STS is a field dedicated to studying the institutions and practices of scientists, engineers, physicians, architects, planners, and other technical professionals, as well as the complex relationships between science, technology and society. STS employs a variety of methods from the humanities and social sciences to examine how science and technology both influence and are influenced by their social, cultural, and material contexts. A major area of interest is the role of technologies and technological systems in shaping the purposes, possibilities, and meanings of human existence, from the creation of novel biological organisms to the design of urban infrastructures and the management of global risks to health, food, security, humab freedom, and the environment. For more information, please see http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/about/whatissts.html

Advising

Interested students should first consult with a member of the Executive Committee for the STS Secondary Field, who will serve as the student’s primary advisor. In case of doubt, the student should turn to the Secondary Field director. Students may then be referred to an appropriate Faculty Affiliate in their Department or School for further advice. Courses required for the Secondary Field should be selected in consultation with the student’s STS advisor. Further information is available through the Kennedy School STS Program. Contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

Registration

Students should register for the Secondary Field with the STS Program at the Harvard Kennedy School by e-mailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  for further information.

Requirements

Course Requirements

Students will be required to take four half-courses, distributed as follows:

(i) One framing course from Annex 1, Section (i). These are general courses offering an overview of STS theories and methods, as well as a broad orientation to the field. Students may take additional framing courses to satisfy requirements .**Note: Students in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences may not satisfy the framing course requirement with a course offered by their home department.

(ii) One graduate level topical course from Annex 1, Section (ii). These are complementary courses that deepen students’ acquaintance with STS analytic approaches as applied to different domains of science, technology, and medicine.

(iii) Two half-courses of related interest from Annex 1, Section (iii-v).

A full list of STS courses may be found at http://www.hks.harvard.edu/sts/field/courses.html

Other Requirements

In the course of their PhD studies at Harvard, students in the humanities and social sciences must present a talk in the STS Circle sponsored by the Kennedy School’s STS Program with support from GSAS. This talk should demonstrate the student’s capacity to present an original, theoretically informed analysis of a problem at the intersection of science, technology and society. Proposals to present in the STS Circle should be accompanied by a note of approval from the student’s STS advisor. For students in the natural sciences, a capstone project, developed in consultation with the student’s advisor, may take the place of the STS Circle presentation.

STS Courses for Secondary Field

(i) Framing Courses (offering foundational introduction to the field)

  • IGA-513. Science, Power and Politics (HKS, offered each fall)
    IGA-956Y : Science, Technology, and Society: Research Seminar
    History of Science 200, Knowing the World: An Introduction to the History of Science (FAS)

 

(ii) Methods Courses (deepening specialist knowledge in field)

  • African and African American Studies 178. Health, Society, and Subjectivity in the American Context (FAS)
    African and African American Studies 189x. Medicine, Culture, and Society (FAS)
    Anthropology 1495. The Materiality of Culture: Objects, Meaning, the Self (FAS)
    Anthropology 1850. Ethnography and Personhood – offered alternate years  (FAS)
    DES 0343100. A Science of the Environment (GSD)
    Economics 2099. Topics in the History of Economic Thought (FAS)
    Economics 2888r. Economics of Science and Engineering Workshop (FAS)
    History 1330. Social Thought in Modern America (FAS)
    History 1940. Science and the Global Human Past: Case Studies at the Cutting Edge: Conference Course (FAS)
    History 2968. History and Economics (FAS)
    History of Science 150. History of the Human Sciences (FAS)
    History of Science 259. The History of the History of Science (FAS)
    HT 934. Introduction to Global Medicine: Bioscience, Technologies, Disparities, Strategies (HMS)
    IGA 515. Bioethics, Law and the Life Sciences (HKS)
    IGA 516. Law, Science, and Society in America (HKS)
    IGA 518. Expertise and Rulership in Law and Science (HKS) 
    Sociology 114. Organizational Failures and Disasters: Leadership in Crisis (FAS)
    Sociology 128. Models of Social Science Research (FAS)
    Sociology 162. Medical Sociology (FAS)
    SW51. Politics of Nature (FAS)
    SW25. Case Studies in Global Health: Biosocial Perspectives (FAS)

 

(iii) Related Courses (FAS)

  •  
  • Anthropology 1640. Language and Culture
    Anthropology 1698. Anthropology of Death and Afterlife: Seminar Anthropology 1876 - Society, Culture, and Modernity in Greece
    Anthropology 1882.The Woman and the Body
    Anthropology 2704. Linguistic Pragmatics and Cultural Analysis in Anthropology
    Anthropology 2785. Theories of Subjectivity in Current Anthropology
    Anthropology 2805. Biopolitics. 
    Anthropology 2876. New Ethnographies in the Anthropology of Social Experience and Moral Life 
    Engineering Sciences 139. Innovation in Science and Engineering: Conference Course 
    Engineering Sciences 239. Advanced Innovation in Science and Engineering: Conference Course 
    Engineering Sciences 201. Decision Theory 
    Environmental Science and Public Policy 77. Technology, Environment and Society – offered in alternate years 
    Environmental Science and Public Policy 78. Environmental Politics – offered in alternate years
    Government 1093. Ethics, Biotechnology, and the Future of Human Nature 
    Government 2034. Ethics, Economics, and Law 
    Government 3000. Approaches to the Study of Politics 
    Government 3004. Research Workshop in American Politics 
    History 1318. History of the Book and of Reading
    History 1445. Science and Religion in American Public Culture
    History 1457. History of American Capitalism
    History 2468hf. The Environment and the American Past: Seminar
    History 2951. The Environmental Turn in History: Seminar
    History of Science 135. From Darwin to Dolly: A History of the Modern Life Sciences
    History of Science 138. Sex, Gender, and Evolution 
    History of Science 139. The Postgenomic Moment
    History of Science 149. The History and Culture of Stigma
    History of Science 176. Brainwashing and Modern Techniques of Mind Control
    History of Science 198. Controversy: Explorations at the Intersection of Science, Policy, and Politics
    History of Science 231.Transforming Technologies: Science, Technology, and Social Change
    History of Science 237. Postgenomics
    History of Science 248. Ethics and Judgment in the History of Science and Medicine
    History of Science 259. History of the History of Science 
    Microbiology 213. Social Issues in Biology 
    Philosophy 149z . Philosophy of Science
    Psychology 2450.  Affective and Social Neuroscience
    Psychology 1509. Self and Identity
    Psychology 1750. Free Will, Responsibility, and Law 
    Psychology 2554r. Moral Cognition: Research Seminar
    Sociology 165. Inequalities in Health Care
    Sociology 243. Economic Sociology
    Sociology 236. Cultural Processes in the Production of Inequality
    Sociology 304. Culture and Social Analysis Workshop

 

(iv)Related Courses (HKS and GSD)

  • API 302: Analytic Frameworks for Policy (HKS)
    DPI 201A. The Responsibilities of Public Action (HKS)
    DPI 562. Public Problems: Advice, Strategy and Analysis (HKS)
    IGA 408M. Learning from the Failure of Climate Policy (HKS)
    IGA 944. Sustainability Science: Policy Analysis and Design for Sustainable Development (HKS)
    DES 0342800. Digital Culture: Architecture and the City (GSD)
    DES 0343400. Architecture and Art: From Minimalism to Neuro-phenomenology (GSD)
    DES 0345700. How to do Things with Words (GSD)
    HIS 0435400: Imagining the City: Literature, Film, and the Arts (GSD)
    HIS 0411500. History and Theory of Urban Interventions (GSD)
    HIS 0443800. War, Maps + Cities (GSD)
    SES 0521100. Cities by Design (GSD)
    SCI 064380. What is energy and how (else) might we think about it? (GSD)

 

(v)Related Courses (Other Schools)

  • HBS 4420. PSY 2650. Behavioral Approaches to Decision Making and Negotiation (HBS)
    HBS 1166. Managing International Trade and Investment (HBS)
    HLS 1017. The Politics of Private Law in Comparative Perspective (HLS)
    HLS 2011. The Art of Social Change: Child Welfare, Education and Juvenile Justice (HLS)
    HLS 2068. Employment Discrimination (HLS)
    HLS 2076. Ethics, Economics and the Law (HLS)
    HLS 2079. Evidence (HLS)
    HLS 2084. Family Law (HLS)
    HLS 2094. Future of the Family: Adoption, Reproduction and Child Welfare (HLS)
    HLS 2101. Global Law and Governance (HLS)
    HLS 2107. Health Law (HLS)
    HLS 2119. Intellectual Property Law: Advanced (HLS)
    HLS 2141. Law and Psychology - The Emotions: Seminar (HLS)
    HLS 2145. Law and Economic Development (HLS)
    HLS 2240. Theory and Practice of Social Change (HLS)
    HLS 2279. Critical Race Theory (HLS)
    HLS 2319. Theories About Law (HLS)
    HLS 2389. Legal Thought Now: Law and the Structure of Society (HLS)
    HLS 2402. Copyright (HLS)
    HLS 2506. The Genealogy of Continental Philosophy and Law (HLS)
    HLS 2540. Reproductive Rights and Justice (HLS)
    HLS 2545. Rethinking the Legal and Ethical Status of Humans, Animals, and the Environment (HLS)
    HLS 2549. Critical Legal Studies: A Retrospective (HLS)
    HLS 2575. Law of Research with Humans and Animals (HLS)
    HLS 2607. Genetics and the Law (HLS)
    HLS 2617. Constitutional and Health Law: Reproductive Rights (HLS)
    HLS 2620. Foundations of Justice (HLS)
    GHP 293-01. Individual & Social Responsibility for Health (HSPH)
    HPM 213. Public Health Law (HSPH)
    ID 250. Ethical Basis of Public Health (HSPH)
    SBS 506. Disease Distribution Theory (HSPH)
    SM715: Seminar in Global Health Equity (HMS)

 

STUDIES OF WOMEN, GENDER, AND SEXUALITY

The secondary field in Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality (WGS) is open to all students enrolled in doctoral programs at Harvard. WGS encourages interested students to declare their interest in the secondary field early in their doctoral program to ensure that they can fulfill all requirements in a timely manner.

Coursework

The secondary field requires completion of four graduate-level courses in the studies of WGS with a grade of B+ or above:

  • The graduate proseminar (WGS 2000, offered in the spring).
  • The WGS theory foundation course (WGS 1210).
  • Two others selected from among graduate courses (or upper-level seminars) taught by members of the Committee on Degrees in the Studies of WGS, or other graduate courses in the field, as deemed appropriate by the WGS director of graduate studies in consultation with the student.

These courses may be used to satisfy departmental requirements. For courses numbered below 2000 (primarily for undergraduates), graduate students must complete the designated graduate-level requirements.

Please consult the WGS website for a list of faculty who teach WGS courses and a list of pre-approved courses , which will be updated each year.

WGS also strongly encourages graduate students to enroll in courses offered by the interdisciplinary and inter-institutional Graduate Consortium in Women’s Studies (GCWS); courses are listed on the GCWS website .

Demonstrating Mastery in the Secondary Field
The secondary field also requires students to compose an article-length paper suitable for publication -- this can be a chapter of the dissertation -- and to serve one term as a salaried teaching fellow in a course offered by WGS faculty.

Students with specific questions about the secondary field should contact Mari Ruti, director of graduate studies, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

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