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GSAS Students Selected as Film Study Center Fellows

Posted Thursday, 03 May 2012

Eight GSAS students are among the 2012–2013 class of fellows recently selected by the Film Study Center (FSC) at Harvard.

FSC-Harvard fellowships provide funding and technical resources for students and faculty undertaking compelling work in video, film, sound, or photography. These fellowships support advanced work, from the ethnographic to the experimental, that explores and expands the expressive potential of audiovisual media. The fellowships are open to Harvard faculty, graduate students, teaching assistants, teaching fellows, and postdoctoral and research fellows.

Important nonfiction films produced with the FSC’s assistance over the years include John Marshall’s The Hunters (1958), Robert Gardner’s Forest of Bliss (1985), Ross McElwee’s Bright Leaves (2003), and Sharon Lockhart’s Lunch Break (2008). While nonfiction film and video continue to be a main focus of this fellowship, widely divergent media and genres have also been supported, including animation, multimedia installation, and sound.

GSAS-affiliated FSC-Harvard fellows listed here:

Cynthia Browne is a doctoral student in Anthropology, with a secondary field in Critical Media Practice. Her Project, Ginkgo Biloba, is a cinematic portrait of an older woman artist living in Werden, Germany that focuses on her practices of making creative work and how those practices embody and communicate their own form of practical wisdom.

Cuilan Liu is a doctoral student in Sanskrit and Indian Studies, with a secondary field in Critical Media Practice. Her project, Young Jigmed, follows a young Tibetan monk's struggles in the early days of his monastic life.

Finnian Moore Gerety is a doctoral student in South Asian Studies. His project, Chakyar, is a portrait of Sanskritic performance in contemporary Kerala, focusing on one teacher/performer of the Chakyar caste who has revitalized traditional modes of temple performance by teaching his art to teams of teenagers.

Benjamin Shaffer is a doctoral student in Media Anthropology. His project, 15204, is a meditation on the aesthetics of ruins and the everyday experiences of local residents in a fallen steel town on the outskirts of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

J.P. Sniadecki is a doctoral student in Media Anthropology. His project, The Iron Ministry, is a feature-length documentary that depicts China's sprawling railway system and examines the social experience of train travel during rapid and tumultuous development.

Stephanie Spray is a doctoral student in Media Anthropology, with a secondary field in Critical Media Practice. Her project, Reflections on the Seasons, is a series of inter-related video and sound works thematically linked in their attention to the cycles of the seasons and how seasonal routines of labor connect people to the land.

Maria Stalford is a doctoral student in Anthropology, with a secondary field in Critical Media Practice. Her two projects are Luc Hoa temple and Can Tho City Oncology Hospital. Luc Hoa temple is a portrait of community life in a lay-led Buddhist temple in Boston. Can Tho City Oncology Hospital is a glimpse of the social world of a Vietnamese oncology hospital.

Julia Yezbick is a doctoral student in Media Anthropology, with a secondary field in Critical Media Practice. Her project, How to Rust, explores how the aesthetics of labor and work are being mobilized to redefine what it means to make things (and places) in a post-industrial city.